Oct 092020
 

Nine Ways Mindfulness Reduces Stress

Mounting evidence from multiple studies indicate that mindfulness builds resilience and helps energize you. Here’s how mindfulness gives you the space to respond calmly under pressure. The article includes a meditation for lowering stress levels.

Protect your brain from stress

It’s not uncommon to feel disorganized and forgetful when you’re under a lot of stress. But over the long term, stress may actually change your brain in ways that affect your memory. Stress management may reduce health problems linked to stress, which include cognitive problems and a higher risk for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Self-Compassion Makes Life More Manageable

Western society celebrate self-confidence, and encourages people to build this quality. But for greater success and happiness, self-compassion may be more beneficial. Self-compassion encourages you to acknowledge and accept your limitations and flaws. This can lead to positive changes in your life because instead of tearing yourself down, you accept that you’re human.

~ Linda-Ann Stewart

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Aug 142020
 

Managing Stress Requires a Sense of Control

How you respond to stress is greatly determined by whether you believe you are helpless or in control of your destiny. Your choices created your results, and you make them based on how empowered you feel. Discover how you can develop your personal power and take charge of your life.

People Constantly Underestimate How Much They Benefit From Being Kind

In general, people will defend any attempt to get them out of their comfort zone, whether it’s good for them or not. But people who think about others tend to make changes that are beneficial for them. Compassion unlocks your capacity for self-improvement.

It is easier to be “present” if you can master this one cognitive technique

Being “in the moment” reduces stress, pain and improves well being. It’s a form of mindfulness, where you are paying attention to what you’re doing and feeling at that point in time. But it’s a skill that takes some practice to develop, but the effort is worth it as it will leave you better off.

~ Linda-Ann Stewart

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Aug 072020
 

To Feel More Productive, Take a Break to Do Something Selfless

In our pressured, hectic lives, it seems like we don’t have enough time to get everything done. Crossing an item off your to-do list gives you a feeling of accomplishment, but then you add three more items. Self-care is important for your wellbeing, but doesn’t make you productive. However, being altruistic gives you a sense that you have more time to get things done.

How to Stay Motivated and Reach Your Big Goals in Life

To accomplish your goals, you have to stay motivated, even for the tasks you don’t like. Here are 5 simple, yet effective, ways on how to get motivated and stay on course to your goal. You don’t have to use all of them to be effective. Mix and match the ones that work for you.

Stress Management: How to Reduce, Prevent, and Cope with Stress

Sometimes it seems like there’s nothing you can do about your stress. You may feel overwhelmed and powerless over it. But you have more control than you think. You can take charge of how you manage your thoughts, actions and how you handle your problems. Explore the 6 strategies in this article to manage your stress and discover a more balanced life.

~ Linda-Ann Stewart

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May 292020
 

Top 10 Ways to Train Your Brain to Stay Focused

Focus is one of the skills you need it you want to get things done and be successful. But our fractured lives undermine this precious ability. The good news is that it is an skill that can be cultivated and learned. Using these strategies will help you build more focus so you can be more effective and productive.

Spiritual Intelligence: What It Is and How Leaders Can Use It to Thrive

Think of it as emotional intelligence taken to the next level. Essentially, it can improve resilience, empathy, calmness, and creativity. This contributes to higher morale and better customer relations, among other things. When leaders understand the 3 points in this article, they can take advantage of its benefits.

9 Tips to Help You Co-exist Peacefully With Difficult People

Everybody has to deal with a difficult person at some time or other. And it’s always a trial to figure out what to do to get along with them. Not only does this article give valuable tips on how to handle them, it includes suggestions from various leaders on how to do so.

~ Linda-Ann Stewart

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Mar 082019
 

Rainbow

How to Solve Problems Effectively and Ethically
Most people don’t clearly define or agree to what their conflict is. And often, they solve the wrong problem. Once you properly articulate the core problem, the solution often presents itself. Learn the steps to identify the correct problem you need to solve, so you find the solution that addresses the core issue.

Why Daydreaming Can Improve Your Mental Health
Contrary to popular belief, new research shows that a mental break can make you happier and more productive. Not only do you control it, but it can reduce stress and give you a break from your work demands.

Training compassion ‘muscle’ may boost brain’s resilience to others’ suffering
A new study suggests that as little as two weeks of compassion meditation training, which is intentionally cultivating positive wishes to understand and relieve the suffering of others, may reduce the distress a person feels when witnessing another’s suffering. Instead of being upset, the person can learn to be calmer and able to respond in a more balanced way.

Sparks of Insight

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Sep 172018
 

Sparks of InsightYou will always be aware of those less fortunate than you. Those who have lost their job, suffered a health challenge, or experienced some setback. It’s tempting to sympathize with them and their hardship, but that’s just feeding it energy. Empathize with the person, not the misfortune. When you share your compassion with the person, but not the misery, you remain aware that they have the power and ability to overcome their difficulty. Even if you don’t verbalize it to the person, you’re holding a higher view of them than they can do at that moment. You don’t become part of the problem, but part of the solution, even if you do nothing but hold this thought.

~ Linda-Ann Stewart

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Mar 012018
 

Flagstaff Aspen RainbowPower Causes Brain Damage
You know the old saying, “Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely”? This is a fascinating article about how leaders lose mental capacities, most notably for reading other people, that were essential to their rise. As they become powerful, those abilities are no longer necessary. This isn’t just theory, it’s been observed and measured.

Creative Mess, Creative Clutter
Many years ago, I read that clutter gives rise to creativity, because creativity is actually creating something out of chaos. Now there’s some evidence to back that up. This article cites a study that ideas that emerge in a cluttered room are more innovative than those in a tidy one.

Science Says Silence Is Much More Important To Our Brains Than We Think
This article cites various studies that are showing that silence may actually grow our brains by adding new cells. Quiet also allows you to process information more fully. Silence reduces stress and improves cognition, among other things.

~ Linda-Ann Stewart

Compassion For The Less Fortunate Promotes Success And Happiness

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Feb 132012
 

Some positive thinking philosophies tell you to avoid charitable works and those who are poverty stricken. The theory is that you might get sucked into their consciousness, and lose your empowered viewpoint. That you could become sympathetic and then part of the problem. Or that you wouldn’t hold the “needy” as powerful enough to heal their wounds or overcome their problems. Somehow, leaving them to their own devices is supposed to empower them to “pull themselves up by their own bootstraps.”

However, I’ve observed people who follow this idea tend to become judgmental and contemptuous about those who are less fortunate. This doesn’t fulfill the spirit of the ideal. Instead, it creates a callousness that negatively impacts their character and undermines the positive attitude that they mean to cultivate. It tends to breed a sense of arrogance and superiority.

Insulating yourself from others’ suffering may mean that you don’t get the opportunity to develop compassion. In a recent study, those who are in the lower socio-economic classes are more responsive to suffering and more compassionate than those in the more affluent class.

The UC Berkeley researchers conjecture that the upper classes aren’t “coldhearted,” it’s just that they haven’t had to deal with the challenges the lower classes have. Therefore, their theory is that the upper classes don’t recognize the distress expressed by people.

Becoming aware of when others are experiencing distress, suffering and anxiety is the first step to becoming more compassionate. With compassion, you can be aware of others’ emotions without getting drawn into the problem. You can then choose a response that can best support and empower the sufferer.

Emotional Intelligence, which has been called more important than I.Q., is the ability to perceive and label yours and others’ emotions. It’s said that this skill is necessary for you to fulfill your full potential in your personal and professional life. So it’s even good for your success in life to be more aware of how other people are feeling.

Compassion opens the heart, reduces stress, promotes success and encourages happiness. Being concerned about the well being of others improves your own.

Inspired by the article: Lower Classes Quicker to Show Compassion in the Face of Suffering

~ Linda-Ann Stewart